The DevOps 2.3 Toolkit

Kubernetes

Deploying and managing highly-available and fault-tolerant applications at scale

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The goal of this book is not to convince you to adopt Kubernetes but to provide a detailed overview of its features. I want you to become confident in your Kubernetes knowledge and only then choose whether to embrace it. That is, unless you already made up your mind and stumbled upon this book in search of Kubernetes guidance.

The plan is to cover all aspects behind Kubernetes, from basic to advanced features. We’ll go not only through the tools behind the official project but also third-party add-ons. I hope that, by the time you finish reading this book, you will be able to call yourself “Kubernetes ninja”. I cannot say that you will know everything there is to know about the Kubernetes ecosystem. That would be impossible to accomplish since its growing faster than any single person could follow. What I can say is that you will be very confident in running a Kubernetes cluster of any scale in production.

Like all my other books, this one is very hands-on. There will be just enough theory for you to understand the principles behind each topic. The book is packed with examples, so I need to give you a heads up. Do not buy this book if you’re planning to read it on a bus or in bed before going to sleep. You will need to be in front of your computer. A terminal will be your best friend. kubectl will be your lover.

The book assumes that you feel comfortable with containers, especially Docker. We won’t go into details how to build an image, what is container registry, and how to write Dockerfile. I hope you already know all that. If that’s not the case, you might want to postpone reading this and learn at least basic container operations. This book is about things that happen after you built your images and stored them in a registry.

This book is about running containers at scale and not panicking when problems arise. It is about the present and the future of software deployment and monitoring. It’s about embracing the challenges and staying ahead of the curve.

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The DevOps 2.2 Toolkit

Building Self-Adaptive And Self-Healing Docker Clusters

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It seems that with each new book the scope gets fuzzier and less precise. When I started writing Test-Driven Java Development the scope of the whole book was done in advance. I had a team working with me. We defined the index and a short description of each chapter. From there on we worked on a schedule as most technical authors do. Then I started writing the second book. The scope was more obscure. I wanted to write about DevOps practices and processes and had only a very broad idea what will be the outcome. I knew that Docker had to be there. I knew that configuration management is a must. Microservices, centralized logging, and a few other practices and tools that I used in my projects were part of the initial scope. For that book, I had no one behind me. There was no team but me, a lot of pizzas, an unknown number of cans of Red Bull, and many sleepless nights. The result is The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit: Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices. With the third book, the initial scope became even more obscure. I started writing without a plan. It was supposed to be about cluster management. After a couple of months of work, I attended DockerCon in Seattle where we were presented with the new Docker Swarm Mode. My immediate reaction was to throw everything I wrote to trash and start over. I did not know what will the book be about except that it must be something about Docker Swarm. I was impressed with the new design. Something about Swarm ended up being The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit: Docker Swarm: Building, testing, deploying, and monitoring services inside Docker Swarm clusters. While working on it, I decided to make DevOps Toolkit Series. I thought that it would be great to record my experiences from different experiments, and from working with various companies and open source projects. So, naturally, I started thinking and planning the third installment in the series; The DevOps Toolkit 2.2. The only problem is that, this time, I honestly did not have a clue what will it about. One idea was to do a deep comparison of different schedulers (e.g., Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, and Mesos/Maraton). The another was to explore serverless. Even though it is a terrible name (there are servers, we just don’t manage them), it is a great subject. The ideas kept coming, but there was no clear winner. So, I decided not to define the scope. Instead, I defined some general objectives.

The goals I set in front of were to build a self-adaptive and self-healing system based on Docker. When I started writing this book, I did not know how I will do that. There were different bits of practices and tools I’ve been using, but there was no visible light at the end of the tunnel. Instead of defining what the book will be, I defined what I want to accomplish. You can think of this book as my recording of the journey. I had to explore a lot. I had to adopt some new tools and write some code myself. Think of this book as “Viktor’s diary while trying to do stuff.”

The objectives are to go beyond a simple setup of a cluster, services, continuous deployment, and all the other things you probably already know. If you don’t, read my older books.

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The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit

Building, testing, deploying, and monitoring services inside Docker Swarm clusters

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The book envelops all aspects of building, testing, deploying, and monitoring services inside Docker Swarm clusters. We’ll go through all the tools required for running a cluster. We’ll go through the whole process with clusters running locally on a laptop. Once we are confident with the outcome, we’ll translate the experience to different hosting providers like AWS, Azure, DigitalOcean, and so on.

The book goes deeper into one of the subjects explored in The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit. It is updated to use the latest and greatest features and techniques introduced in Docker 1.12.

We’ll go through many practices and even more tools. While there will be a lot of theory, this is a hands-on book. You won’t be able to complete it by reading it in a metro on a way to work. You’ll have to read this book while in front of the computer and get your hands dirty.

Buy it now from Amazon, LeanPub, or look for it through your favorite book seller.

The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit

Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices

This book is based on very old technology and the code behind it is not maintained anymore. If you do like reading about the “old” tech, get it for free from LeanPub.

This book is about different techniques that help us architect software in a better and more efficient way with microservices packed as immutable containers, tested and deployed continuously to servers that are automatically provisioned with configuration management tools. It’s about fast, reliable and continuous deployments with zero-downtime and ability to roll-back. It’s about scaling to any number of servers, design of self-healing systems capable of recuperation from both hardware and software failures and about centralized logging and monitoring of the cluster.In other words, this book envelops the whole microservices development and deployment lifecycle using some of the latest and greatest practices and tools. We’ll use Docker, Kubernetes, Ansible, Ubuntu, Docker Swarm and Docker Compose, Consul, etcd, Registrator, confd, and so on. We’ll go through many practices and even more tools. Finally, while there will be a lot of theory, this is a hands-on book. You won’t be able to complete it by reading it in a metro on a way to work. You’ll have to read this book while in front of the computer and get your hands dirty.

Get it for free from LeanPub, or look for it through your favorite book seller.